Tag Archives: Sula Vineyards

Private tasting at Flavor Diaries

Private tasting at Flavor Diaries
Great fun to host a tasting and share Indian origin wines, beer and single malt for 14 of Dubai’s leading bartenders during their current tour of India on behalf of Glenfiddich at Flavour Diaries. The tasting included Sula Vineyards, Reveilo Winery, Fratelli Vineyards, Casablanca Sparkling Wine, Charosa Vineyards, Bira 91 and Paul John.
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Celebrating India’s Finest 2018

Celebrating India’s Finest 2018
All Things Nice hosted the 6th edition of ‘Celebrating India’s Finest’, an evening recognizing winners of the ‘Indian Wine Consumer Choice Awards’ held in January this year. Celebrating India’s Finest, presented by HT 48 Hours, Hafele and Living Foodz in association with Lucaris Crystal Glassware and Cathay Pacific Airlines was hosted at the  Hafele Design Centre SOBO. Delectable hors d’oeuvres carefully curated by Eat Drink Design and paired with the wide selection of wine completed the indulgent experience. Guests also enjoyed a fine selection of Pascati Chocolates with the wines. Participating wineries included Casablanca, Charosa Wineries, Four Seasons Wines, Grover Zampa Vineyards, Oakwood Vineyards, Reveilo Wines, Soma Vineyards, Sula Vineyards, Syonaa Wines and The Daily Dose.
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The Chef Jed Gerrard dinner at Sofitel Hotel

The Chef Jed Gerrard dinner at Sofitel Hotel
All Things Nice celebrated contemporary cuisine based on the indigenous ethos of Western Australia with Executive Chef Jed Gerrard of Wildflower, COMO The Treasury, Perth AU at Sofitel Mumbai BKC. A five course dinner carefully curated by Chef Jed Gerrard & Chef Prakash Lopes of the Sofitel Mumbai BKC paired with a fantastic selection of wine by Sommelier Nikhil Agarwal. Presented by Cox and Kings and WA Government News In association with Australian Consulate-General, Mumbai, Cathay Pacific, FOOD & WINE INDIA, Classic Coffee, Jean-Claude Biguine India, Mud House Wines, Hardys Wines, Rémy Martin, Sula Vineyards and Sula Selections
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Celebrating India’s Finest 2017

Celebrating India’s Finest 2017 – All Things Nice, Liebherr and HT 48 Hours presented Celebrating India’s Finest in association with Lifestyle Partner Living Foodz and Hospitality Partner Sofitel Mumbai BKC.

Event Partners include Uber, Pascati Chocolate,  Spiegelau, Jean-Claude Biguine India and Atma

Participating wineries were Charosa Vineyards,  Myra Vineyards,  Sula Vineyards,  Good Drop Wine Cellars, Grover Zampa Vineyards,  Soma Vine Village,  Nine Hills, Oakwood Vineyards Reveilo Wines and York Winery.

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Celebrating India’s Finest 2017

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All Things Nice hosted the 5th edition of ‘Celebrating India’s Finest’, an evening recognizing winners of the ‘Indian Wine Consumer Choice Awards’ held in January. Celebrating India’s Finest was presented by Liebherr and HT 48 Hours in association with lifestyle partner Living Foodz on at Sofitel Mumbai BKC Friday, February 17th 2017

Wineries showcased their winning wines along with their entire portfolio to an audience of absolute wine enthusiasts. Approximately 200 guests including members of All Things Nice, winery owners, ATMA supporters, consulate members, chefs, restaurateurs & hoteliers and professionals from the wine fraternity were seen enjoying the wines on display. Guests enjoyed a free flow of every type and style of wine produced in India. From full bodied reds to fruity whites and dessert wines, there was something for every palate.

Sommelier & CEO Nikhil Agarwal, All Things Nice said “The 5th edition of Celebrating India’s Finest was the biggest that we have put together so far. We had wonderful partners and I’m happy that our guests enjoyed the width of quality wines produced in India.”

Delectable appetizers carefully curated by Living Foodz Chef Rakhee Vaswani in association with Sofitel Mumbai BKC made the night a truly indulgent experience. Guests sipped and savoured your favourite wines in beautiful glassware by Spiegelau. The night was filled with fantastic wine, great food and fabulous company.

Biswajit Chakraborty, General Manager, Sofitel Mumbai BKC said, “Sofitel Mumbai BKC is pleased to have hosted ‘Celebrating India’s Finest’, an occasion that honoured and rewarded, the best of the wineries from ‘The Indian Wine Consumer’s Choice Awards’. We are proud to host a magnificent portfolio of wine winners and wine connoisseurs from across India. In fact, Sofitel Mumbai BKC houses the only wine tower in the city with an array of 800 wines.”

Wining Wineries That Participated

  1. Charosa Vineyards
  2. Good Drop Wine Cellars
  3. Myra Vineyards
  4. Nine Hills
  5. Reveilo Wines
  6. Sula Vineyards
  7. York Winery
  8. Grover Zampa Vineyards
  9. Oakwood Winery
  10. Soma Vineyards

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Domestic producers come together to boost Indian wine – Financial Express

Domestic producers come together to boost Indian wine

Indian wines are about to get a new lease of life. Major Indian wineries have decided to get together, through the newly constituted board of the All India Producers Association (AIWPA), to promote Indian wines in a big way via a promotional effort termed ‘Wines of India’.

Although the sector, which is over a decade old in the country, has been growing steadily, wineries have been feeling the need to push wines more aggressively and have therefore made the effort. This is perhaps the first attempt of its kind where players in a sector have come together to promote a product.

The objective is to tell consumers that Indian wines are good, says Yatin Patil, president, AIWPA. The effort which has already taken off includes the participation of around 12 wineries and hopes to include more wineries as more awareness spreads among consumers. The association has roped in wine and spirits consultancy All Things Nice to coordinate the ‘Wines of India’ initiative, to work with the wine companies both in India and globally. The firm specialises in luxury wines and spirits and organises over 500 events annually. The company works with large wineries and spirit companies and gourmet food companies, hotels and restaurants, and large corporates.

According to Nikhil Agarwal, sommelier and director, All Things Nice, most consumers prefer imported wines over Indian wines. However, consumers are not aware that some of the Indian wines are far superior to many overseas varietals.

“Our effort is to tell consumers to keep an open mind and also learn about Indian wines,” he said. “Moreover, while there are several Indian brands or varietals that consumers are familiar with, they also to know that there are many more brands which are just as good and there are several varietals that companies produce that have gone unnoticed,” he said.

In the next couple of months, some 30 events have been planned around this effort. A special logo has been created for Wines of India. wherein all the products by these companies are showcased to consumers through wine tastings, promotional events, samplings and trade shows.

The erstwhile Indian Grape Processing Board (IGPB) has been presenting Indian wines under a common umbrella of Wines of India during its export promotions in overseas markets through  APEDA. The board has showcased Indian wines at Hong Kong, the UK, Canada and Germany in the past. This effort will continue in association with the consultancy and the association.

Patil says that although the effort initially includes top wineries of India including Sula Vineyards, Grover Zampa Wines, Fratelli, Charosa, Vintage Wines and York Wines, more wineries will be added to the list as the concept grows. “As of now, there are several wineries in the country that do not have a pan India presence. These are growing and are on their way to selling their products across India, ” Agrawal said.

Spirited effort
* Major Indian wineries have decided to get together, and through the newly constituted board of the All India Producers Association (AIWPA), have decided to promote Indian wines in a big way through a promotional effort termed ‘Wines of India’
* Although the sector, which is over a decade old in the country, has been growing steadily, wineries have been feeling the need to push wines more aggressively and have therefore made the effort

Wines Of India

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Wines of India, is a collective body set up by India’s leading wine brands in an initiative to support Indian wine in India and overseas. Wines chosen to be part of the Wines of India programme have been selected on the basis of merit only and represent only the best India has to offer. The programme is an amalgamation of pioneers like Sula Vineyards, Reveilo Vineyards, Grover Zampa Vineyards, Nine Hills, Fratelli Vineyards with more recently launched wineries like Myra Vineyards, Soma Vineyards, Charosa Vineyards, Vallonne Vineyards, Good Drop Cellars and York Winery.

Each winery in the Wines of India programme has introduced their own unique style of wine making, interesting grape varieties, technological innovation and marketing expertise. India, a budding wine nation, has made waves globally by winning awards at the renowned International Wine & Spirits Challenge and Decanter World Wine Awards. Indian consumers are now waking up to the true potential of Indian wine and recognizing that quality standards and wine making styles are now on par with countries that have been making wine for thousands of years.

Wines of India

Leading Indian wineries have come together to form ‘Wines of India’ WOI, a collective body set up as an initiative to support and promote Indian wine in India and internationally. Wines selected to be part of the Wines of India programme have been selected on the basis of merit only and will represent only the best India has to offer.  The body currently represents 12 of India’s most favourite wineries; Sula Vineyards, Charosa Vineyards, Fratelli Wines, Reveilo, Myra Vineyards, Vallonne Vineyards, Good Drop Winery, Soma Vineyards, Grover Zampa, York Winery, Nine Hills and Four Seasons.

WOI has selected All Things Nice to manage all marketing activities on behalf of the entity, with  Sommelier Nikhil Agarwal appointed as  Director of the programme. You can now look forward to a series of exciting events and experiences celebrating these fantastic wines. Stay tuned to the event page on the website for regular updates on how you can enjoy Wines of India with us!

Wines of India

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Wines of India‘ WOI, a collective body set up by India‘s leading wineries is an initiative to support and promote Indianwine in India and internationally. Wines selected to be part of the Wines of India Programme have been selected on the basis of merit only and will represent only the best India has to offer. The list of participating wineries include Good Drop Winery, Charosa Vineyards, Four Seasons Wines, Fratelli Wines, Grover Zampa Vineyards, Myra Vineyards, Nine Hills Wines, Reveilo Wines, Soma Wines, Sula Vineyards, Vallonne Vineyards and York Winery.


WOI has selected All Things Nice to manage all marketing activities on behalf of the entity, they have also appointed Sommelier Nikhil Agarwal as the Director of the Programme. 

‘How are Indian Wines perceived by other countries’- Food Hospitality World

Article from  Food Hospitality World magazine by Sommelier Nikhil Agarwal.

To even write an article with this heading gives you some indication just how far we have come in such a short period of time. I am and have been an ardent supporter of the Indian wine industry for many years now having started my own journey almost 15 years ago with Sula Vineyards. Before I left I was in charge of Sula’s export market so I have been watching Indian wines grow overseas for sometime.

For anyone paying attention, the revolution-taking place in the wine industry is visible for all to see. To fairly summarize what’s happening with Indian wine internationally we first must first look at what’s happening with the industry domestically.

Things are not the same as when I joined the industry 15 years ago. At that time there were only three relevant wineries  – Sula, Indage and Grovers. Three wineries do not make a market; as I remember Rajeev Samant stating that for the industry to grow we need to have more wineries with a focus on quality.

In the last seven odd years there has been a push on quality of wine due to many reasons. More wineries have been set up and therefore there is more competition. We now have a more aware consumer base that is getting to be more confident in judging a good wine from a bad one with conviction. They may not be aficionados or wine enthusiasts but are sure of what their likes or dislikes are without thinking that it’s them and not the wine which is the issue.

It’s only natural that quality a once abandoned virtue by now unsurprisingly defunct wineries is the buzz word of the handful of wineries looking to change things around.

Producers like Vallonne, a small winery with a mighty heart and an uncompromising stance of quality and Fratelli, with its deep pockets, business acumen and more importantly an understanding of wine making through its Italian partnership have created an array of quality wines in the midst of nowhere.

These wineries are now not only vying for consumer attention domestically but are aggressively looking at the international market.  This is an interesting time for Indian wine.

All Things Nice hosted a dinner in Hong Kong with Eddie Mcdougal who I met when Discovery Travel & Living filmed the Indian leg of The Flying Wine Maker. The feedback I got both before and after the dinner was astonishing. Before the guests tasted the wine they confided in me that there were curious but had absolutely no expectations that Indian wine was just as much as a puzzle to them as India was.

But when the wines were served they could not believe it. The wines from Grovers, Sula, Fratelli, Charosa, Myra and Vallonne were all appreciated so much that two of the wineries found themselves on their way into the markets of Hong Kong and China through an importer who attended the dinner.

The fact is that India is making good wine but we haven’t managed to make an industry of it as yet. Indian wine requires itself to make giant strides in the international market to be distinguished as a category. Yes Sula, Grovers and now Fratelli continue to increase their presence internationally but lots more needs to be done. More wineries need to be out there creating Brand India.

So while those in the know have looked at India’s burgeoning wine market and understand its quality levels, the everyday wine consumer internationally has little knowledge that India even makes wine. Within the trade internationally there is a buzz that is beginning to develop. For example I have been invited to Shanghai to speak about the Indian wine industry at SIAL in May 2015, while Fratelli has been chosen as a showcase project at Hannover Messe 2015 with their wines being the official wine at the Indian pavilion. Recently Rajeev Samant spoke at the Masters of Wine symposium. It takes time to build a brand and as you can see, the efforts are on.

You also don’t need to have the wines available internationally to understand what foreign palates prefer.  The number of people from all over the world coming to cities like Mumbai, Delhi/Gurgaon and Bangalore gives us enough of a pool to understand whether we measures up and the answer is yes because even our own Indian consumers who swear by the imported stuff wouldn’t necessarily be able to tell the difference between an Indian and imported in a blind tasting.

For an industry that did not exist more than 20 years ago to where we are today, the journey is quite impressive.  There is yet a long way to go and perhaps we should take this question up again in the next 5 years.  Perhaps we can be bolder and aggressive in our international approach collectively to get the ball rolling faster.

One thing is for sure, either we need to have one or two wineries that come up with break though quality that gets the worlds attention  (like what Yamazaki has done for the Japanese whisky profile) or we need to raise the game collectively through all relevant Indian wineries. Indian wineries are adding awards left right and centre at global wine competitions and since wine enthusiasts tend to be inclined on discovering new wines and new regions I predict that Indian wine will slowly seep into international consumer mindsets as time goes on as long as we play our cards right.